Monday, May 25, 2020

Bullet Journal For The Beginner

Have you heard of a bullet journal? Simply put a bullet journal is a creative organizational journal you get to design to keep track of anything you want to keep track of! Think of it as a blank canvas and the sky is the limit. For people who are visual a bullet journal can help them "see" what they are organizing or keeping track of. 





This post contains affiliate links which means if you click on a link and make a purchase I may receive a small commission at no additional cost to you. For more information please read my Disclaimer page. Thanks!

Bullet journals are so useful for almost anyone! A bullet journal is a place for you to let your imagination and creativity flow freely on each page of your journal. The possibilities for using a bullet journal are endless. 

Today I want to talk about some ideas you can use to start your first bullet journal and what kinds of things you could put in your very first bullet journal. I'll keep it very simple to start but once you get the hang of it and get going with your own you can make your bullet journal into anything you want. 

Grab your blank journal (here is my favorite), colored fine tip pens or pencils and let's get going!

TOP 5 BULLET JOURNAL PAGE IDEAS


#1    Goals For The Year

If you don't have any goals or maybe you have some vague ideas of what you want to accomplish this year a bullet journal is a great place to put those ideas down in writing. Don't worry if you can't fill a whole page, the more time you spend thinking about goals the more likely you are to come up with some more. Leave yourself some room in your journal and space to make changes or "tweaks" to the goals you write down. 

Putting your goals down on paper can be a bit scary at first especially since you might be afraid of not reaching the goal by the end of the year. That is not the point of this exercise. Really this is an accountability and organizational tool that is flexible and should be adjusted as needed. 

#2 Financial Tracker

Do you ever wonder what you have been spending your hard earned paycheck on? Creating a page in your bullet journal can help you monitor your finances more closely but in a less "accounting" kind of way. Instead of a checkbook style how about a calendar with cute pictures of what you bought! 

Maybe you love Starbucks so why not create a section in your bullet journal by month to track your trips to the coffee house. You could draw a cute little coffee cup for each purchase so you can see how often you spend money on your favorite coffee. You might be surprised how often each month you drop a few bucks on coffee.

Whatever your favorite splurge is you can use your bullet journal to track it each month. The result is a cute graphic visual to help you get an idea of where you are spending some of your money.

# 3 Mood or Activity Tracker

Tracking your mood and activities on a daily basis is a fun exercise. If you think you are feeling grumpy or down in the dumps more often than usual why not track your mood to see what is causing this slump. 

Maybe you are wondering if you are getting enough activity or variety of activity. Use your bullet journal to track your daily activity. Create a grid with the types of activities along one side and then each time you complete that activity color in one of the grid boxes. You can even color coordinate your activities to make the bullet journal page pretty.

#4 About Me Page

Who do you know the best? Yourself! Create a page dedicated completely to you with your favorite things, what you like to do and the special traits that make you who you are. Think favorite food, music, recreation or activities, favorite book and movie. 

#5 Calendar

Keep track of your busy schedule with a personalized calendar. Include space to jot down fun memories so as you go back over your monthly calendars you can remember the fun times you had and any momentous moments you experienced. 

Wait, there's more - 

My friends at Mint.com provided this FREE bullet journal stickers to help you get started with your first bullet journal. Check out these great downloadable stickers to add to your bullet journal.  Here are a few examples of the free printables:

Monthly Review Stickers:


Customizable Note Stickers



Wednesday, May 13, 2020

Kids Face Mask Sewing Tutorial

Sewing a face mask for your child is easy, even for a sewing beginner. Today I am going to walk you through the simple steps to make a fabric face mask for a child.



This post contains affiliate links which means if you click on a link and make a purchase I may receive a small commission at no additional cost to you. For more information please see my Disclaimer page. Thanks!

I have found, after making countless face masks that there isn't a one-size-fits-all mask for kids because they grow so quickly! What I have discovered is that adjusting the size of the fabric to certain measurements allows you to sew a mask that will fit a variety of age groups. 

Age is a good starting point for creating a child size face mask but if you aren't making the mask for your own child you should probably ask the parent if their child is small or large for their age and adjust your fabric sizes accordingly.

I've put together a chart to help you figure out the dimensions of the fabric to cut out will to make a fabric face mask for a child based on the child's age. 




Now all you have to do is cut out your fabric rectangles (2 per mask) and your elastic (2 per mask) and start sewing. If you are a sewing beginner don't worry, this mask only requires you to sew straight lines! 

The instructions to sew the child size mask are the same as the adult size mask. I've put together a complete tutorial showing you how to sew a face mask with pictures and detailed instructions. The tutorial below uses adult size fabric pieces however all the steps are the same for making a child size mask! Follow along to make your own child size face mask. 

Kids Face Mask Sewing Tutorial


Supplies Needed


Sewing Tutorial Directions:

1. Cut a rectangle from each of the fabrics in the proper dimensions based on the child's age (or size) from the above chart. The cotton fabric will be on the outside of the mask and the soft flannel fabric will be on the inside against your face. Using flannel is optional. If you choose to use cotton fabric for both the inside and outside of the mask that will work just fine too. Cut two pieces of elastic measuring based on the kid's mask size chart.

2. Place the cotton rectangle on the table with the right side facing up. Then lay the flannel rectangle on top of the cotton piece with the wrong size facing up.

3. Place a pin through both fabrics along one of the longer sides of the rectangle. Put a second pin about 1" away through both fabrics. Leave the space between the two pins open so you can turn the mask inside out when you are done sewing them together.




4. Begin sewing your fabrics together starting just after one of the pins. As you approach your first corner of the first short side stop sewing when you are about 1" away from the corner. Lift the top fabric and slide one of the elastic straps between the fabrics and line up one side of the elastic strap to the corner. Close the fabric and then sew over the elastic band several times to ensure it can't pull out. I suggest using a shorter stitch length.




5. Sew down the short side of the mask and again stop about 1" from the corner. Lift open the fabrics and pull the other end of the elastic band and line it up with the corner. Make sure the elastic strap won't be caught in your sewing. Your fabric will bunch up when you pull the elastic to the second corner - don't worry that is OK! Sew over the corner securing the elastic strap. Do the same for the second short side of the mask. Stop sewing around the perimeter of the mask when you get to the last pin marking the 1" opening making sure to back stitch a few stitches in place.



6. Turn the mask inside out through the 1" opening. Finger press or iron the mask flat. Make sure the opening you used to flip the mask inside out is lined up flat so when you sew around the perimeter of the mask it gets sewn shut.


7. We are now going to make three pleats along the short edges of each side of the mask. I find it is easiest to locate the center of each short side then make a 1/2" pleat and pin it in place. Make a another 1/2" pleat above the center pleat and another 1/2" one below the center pleat, pinning each pleat for a total of 3 pleats. Do the same to the other side making sure the pleats on both sides go the same way! The short side of the mask will now measure about 2 1/2 to 3 1/2 inches depending on which size mask you are making and now that you have added pleats.





8. Top stitch around the entire perimeter of the mask using a 1/4" seam allowance. Make sure you sew the 1" opening along the top edge closed too. Also, as you stitch over the pleats I recommend removing the pins as you go so you don't break a needle.

9. Sew a second top stitch about 1/4" away from the first row of top stitching around the perimeter of the mask.




That's it! You are all done - Congratulations! Easy wasn't it? Now you can feel more protected from the nasty germs, dust and other debris floating around the air.




Since your mask is 100% cotton you can wash it and dry it over and over so it can be used multiple times. I highly recommend air drying or drying the mask on low in a dryer since it will shrink due to being cotton.

Please note that this mask is not rated for disease control will not prevent you from getting the Corona Virus or other illnesses. This pattern is from the Turban Project through the Deaconess Health Systems.  According to the CDC, fabric masks are a crisis response option when other supplies have been exhausted. While it isn’t ideal it does offer some support to our communities.


Wednesday, April 29, 2020

How to Make An Envelope From A Brown Paper Grocery Bag

Here is how to make an envelope from a brown paper grocery bag that you can use for shipping almost anything! Making these homemade shipping envelopes is easy and best of all cheap!



This post contains affiliate links which means if you click on the link and make a purchase I may receive a small commission at no additional cost to you. For more information please see my Disclaimer page. Thanks!
I seem to always have a growing pile of brown paper bags from the grocery store that I just can't bring myself to get rid of. Do you have the same problem? So I hang onto them and they just keep piling up. 

Recently I found myself short on shipping materials, mainly large envelopes. As orders for face masks in my Etsy shop started increasing, my need for more shipping envelopes skyrocketed! I started to panic a little until I remembered the growing pile of brown paper bags and I wondered if I now had a solution to fix both problems. 

I got to work creating a DIY envelope I could use to ship out my face masks (or anything else). Guess what? It worked! I could even alter the size of the homemade brown bag envelopes to fit whatever size I needed.


How To Make A Shipping Envelope From A Brown Paper Grocery Bag


Today I'm going to show you how to make an envelope from a brown paper grocery bag. Ready? Let's get started.

Materials List:
Brown paper grocery bag (in fairly good condition)
Scissors
Shipping / Packing tape
Ruler

Step 1
Lay the folded brown paper bag with the bag's bottom flap face up flat on a solid surface. Fold the bottom flap back matching it up with the underside bag bottom (see picture). Cut across the bag to remove the bottom of the bag completely. You should now have a large bag tube.




Step 2
Cut the paper bag "tube" open so that you now have one long continuous rectangle. My cut open bag measures 38" long! (See picture above)

Step 3
This step will vary depending on how big of an envelope you need to make. I am making an envelope that when finished, measures just over 6 1/2" to 7" wide by the height of the bag (minus the bottom) which in my case measured 13 1/2" tall. 

Cut a 14 to 14 1/2" long section of the paper bag. You should now have a 14" x 13 1/2" section of paper bag. 

Step 4
Pick one of the longer sides and make a 1/2" fold along the edge. Then along the bottom edge make a 1/2" fold. The two folded sides should intersect. 

Next, fold over the long side of the bag in half matching up side edges.




Step 5
Using your packing tape securely tape the bottom edge of the envelope and then tape along the side. 

It is optional but I like to take a small piece of tape and from the inside of the bag tape down the folded side and bottom flaps that you make in step 4 above. This just makes sure that whatever you are sending in the envelope won't get stuck to the tape that you used along the bottom and side edges. 




Step 6
Insert whatever you are shipping into your envelope, fold over the top edge and tape it securely closed. 




That's it! Can you believe how simple this whole process was? Not only is it easy to do but the cost to make your own envelope is so small! I buy my bags at Aldi for about 7 cents each and I can make 2-3 envelopes with one bag. The cost of tape is the only other cost which is quite inexpensive. 

I hope this tutorial was useful to you! Please let me know your thoughts in the comment section. Thanks!

Wednesday, April 15, 2020

How To Plant An Indoor Vegetable Garden With Your Kids

Staying mentally healthy is just as important as staying physically healthy for both parents and kids especially during this time of worldwide quarantine. 




This post may contain affiliate links which means if you click on a link and make a purchase I may receive a small commission at no additional cost to you. See my Disclaimer page for more info. Thanks!

As our weather transitions from winter to spring it might seem as though the days are more wet and gloomy than sunny which can have a big impact on your mental health. Spending some time outside in nature, at a safe distance from other people, can provide you with a big positive mental boost but what do you do when day after day it it is cold and rainy? 

How about bring a little of the outdoors inside! Let me show you what we are doing at our house as a way to bring nature inside in the form of an indoor vegetable garden.

Since it is difficult to get gardening supplies right now due to the Corona virus we have had to make due with what we have around the house and in some cases we had to get creative! I didn't have time to get seeds or soil before the quarantine and now in our area those departments in our local stores are closed. 

Instead I had to gather up the supplies we had on hand to get the kids started on making their indoor garden:





Plant An Indoor Garden - Fun Activity To Do With Kids This Spring



Supplies:
empty cardboard egg carton or milk carton
disposable foil pan
potting soil - we used some from an outside planter box
vegetable seeds

It might be hard to get seeds this time of year due to the circumstances but I'm going to bet that some of the produce you have in the refrigerator will provide some seeds for your indoor garden! 

While making dinner the other night I cut open a red pepper and took a few of the seeds and put them into a small pot that had soil in it. Guess what! The little seed germinated and we now have a small itty bitty pepper plant growing in the kitchen. 

Using seeds from vegetables like tomatoes, cucumbers and peppers that you have on hand can be such a fun activity for you and your kids. 

*Just a note when using seeds that are kind of slimy after you cut open a cucumber or tomato it is best to rinse off the seeds and set them on a paper towel to dry for a few days. This will prevent them from molding. Tomato seeds are hard to cultivate but it is fun to give it a try!

We have a small plot of land fenced off in our backyard for our vegetable garden so this year I'm hoping that the seeds we start growing indoors will eventually be planted in our outside garden once the threat of frost is past.

If you are looking for some quick germinating seeds try planing lettuce! We have been keeping track of the seeds we planted to see what ones start coming up first. The lettuce was the winner in our mini indoor foil pan garden! 

The kids LOVE seeing the growth in their mini garden and it seems that each morning when they get up and check their plants there is something new happening. I'm sure when we finally get to plant these baby plants outside the kids will have so much pride in their efforts knowing they cultivated these little plants from seed to fully producing vegetable plants!

Don't worry if you don't have any lettuce seeds. You can still grow lettuce inside! Don't throw away the leftover end of a head of romaine lettuce. Instead fill a small container or glass half full with water and put the end of the romaine lettuce in it. In a few days you will begin to see some exciting changed as new growth appears. 

Gardening is such a therapeutic activity, good for all who get their hands in the dirt and spend time planting seeds. 

It is also a great activity you can do with your kids that is full of opportunities to teach subjects like science, math and reading. If you find yourself suddenly a homeschool parent gardening with your children is an aswesome and effective way to start your homeschooling journey even if it is a short one due to the nationwide quarantine. 


For more great gardening ideas please check out these other posts!


1. DIY Mini-Greenhouse Tutorial


2. Rock Your Garden With A Painted Brick Paver

Tuesday, April 7, 2020

Fabric Face Mask With Ties Sewing Tutorial

With our national and local government recommending all citizens wear non-medical protective face masks it is helpful to be able to make your own. Making a protective fabric face mask is easy to do even for a beginning sewer. 




There are tons of different styles, patterns and ways to make a fabric face mask. In my previous post I put together a tutorial on how to make one with elastic bands that wrap around your ears to hold the mask on. You can see the full tutorial HERE. 

Today I am going to walk you through how to make a mask with fabric ties. It is nice to have the two options in case you don't have elastic available but still want to make a protective fabric face mask. 

This post contains affiliate links which means if you click on a link and make a purchase I may receive a small commission at no additional cost to you. For more information please see my Disclaimer page. Thanks!



Protective Fabric Face Mask With Ties Sewing Tutorial



Supplies 
cotton thread
cotton fabric
cotton flannel fabric (optional)
sewing machine
scissors (I recommend these)
ruler
rotary cutter & mat (optional but very helpful)
pins
iron
fabric pencil or regular pencil


Tutorial Instructions

1. To begin cut a 9" x 6" rectangle from each of the two fabrics. 

Note - I like to use cotton flannel on the inside layer of the face mask because it is softer than regular cotton fabric however this is a personal preference and can be skipped. You can use two layers of plain cotton fabric if you do not want to use flannel fabric.

2. Next cut 4 strips measuring 1" x 20" from the same cotton fabric as the top layer of the face mask. These strips will be made into the tie straps for the mask. To make the ties first lay the strip flat on your ironing board and fold it in half so you have a 1/2" x 20" long strip and iron. 




Open the strip back up then fold the outside raw edges towards the center fold line you just created with the iron. Do this on both the left side and right side of the strip. Iron as you go to keep these folded sides in place. (see pictures above)

Once you finish ironing the sides in fold the strip in half along the first ironed mark tucking the ironed edges inside. You should not have any raw edges along the side of your strip showing any more. 

Now sew along the strip down the entire length where the two edges meet. Repeat this step for all 4 straps. 

Tip - to speed up the fabric tie strap process double the length of the fabric strips (1" x 40") you cut so you only have to sew two long straps. Once you have the two long straps cut them in half to create a total of 4 straps that are 20" long. 

3. Place the cotton rectangle on the table with the right side facing up. Then lay the flannel rectangle on top of the cotton piece with the wrong size facing up.

4. Place a small mark with your fabric pencil or regular pencil along the top side of one of the longer sides of the rectangle. Put a second pencil mark about 1" away through both fabrics. Leave the space between the two marks open so you can turn the mask inside out when you are done sewing them together.

5. Begin sewing your fabrics together starting just after one of the pencil marks. As you approach your first corner of the first short side stop sewing when you are about 1" away from the corner. Lift the top fabric and slide one of the fabric tie straps between the fabrics and line up one side of the tie strap to the corner. Cl
ose the fabric and then sew over the tie strap to ensure it can't pull out. Let the other end of the tie poke out the opposite side of the mask.




Continue sewing around the perimeter of the mask inserting the ties into the corners and sewing over them as you go making sure not to catch the other ends of the ties in your stitching. I find it easiest to keep the loose ends of the ties gathered together, sticking out from the 1" pencil marks along the top of the mask. 

Stop sewing around the perimeter of the mask when you get to the last pencil mark marking the 1" opening making sure to back stitch a few stitches in place.


6. Turn the mask inside out through the 1" opening. Finger press or iron the mask flat. Make sure the opening you used to flip the mask inside out is lined up flat so when you sew around the perimeter of the mask it gets sewn shut.


7. We are now going to make three pleats along the short edges of each side of the mask. I find it is easiest to locate the center of each short side then make a 1/2" pleat and pin it in place. Make a another 1/2" pleat above the center pleat and another 1/2" one below the center pleat, pinning each pleat for a total of 3 pleats. Do the same to the other side making sure the pleats on both sides go the same way! The short side of the mask will now measure about 3 to 3 1/2 inches now that you have added pleats. (please note- the picture below has elastic ear loops not ties, however the process for both types of masks is the same)





8. Top stitch around the entire perimeter of the mask using a 1/4" seam allowance. Make sure you sew the 1" opening along the top edge closed too. Also, as you stitch over the pleats I recommend removing the pins as you go so you don't break a needle.

9. Sew a second top stitch about 1/4" away from the first row of top stitching around the perimeter of the mask.

Congratulations you have completed your protective face mask with tie closure! Now get busy making a bunch more for all of your friends and family!

If you would prefer to make a mask with elastic ear loops please see my post HERE for complete instructions. 

I pray you are staying safe and healthy during the time of the Corona virus (COVID-19) outbreak.


Tuesday, March 24, 2020

Protective Face Mask Sewing Tutorial

Worried about all of the germs floating around in the air when you are out in public? With this Corona virus pandemic people are coming up with creative ways to protect themselves from these awful germs. Besides washing your hands and not touching your face with your hands you may want to consider wearing a protective face mask.



This post contains affiliate links which means if you click on a link and make a purchase I may receive a small commission at no additional cost to you. Thanks!!

Finding the medical face masks is next to impossible right now so many people are resorting to making their own. Today I'm going to show you how to make your own fabric protective face mask! This is a simple sewing project that even a beginner can do.

I have been using the Deaconess Hospital pattern to make my own fabric face masks. I did make a few "tweaks" to their pattern which I will show you as we go. 

If you need a mask right away you can also purchase a ready made one from my Etsy shop HERE.

These fabric face masks are not medical grade but some protection is better than none! If Deaconess Healthcare is requesting hand sewn face mask protection for their medical staff during the COVID-19 pandemic, that says to me that they do provide some protection against viruses and germs. 

Face masks are also great for keeping particles of dust and other pollutants out of your lungs.

Let's start on sewing a face mask! This mask can be adjusted from an adult size to a child size depending on your needs.



Sew Your Own Protective Face Mask


Supplies Needed




Directions:

1. Cut a rectangle measuring 9"x 6" (adult size) or 7.5" x 5" (child size) from both the cotton fabric and the flannel fabric. The cotton fabric will be on the outside of the mask and the soft flannel fabric will be on the inside against your face. Cut two pieces of elastic measuring 6" (adult) or 5" (child).

2. Place the cotton rectangle on the table with the right side facing up. Then lay the flannel rectangle on top of the cotton piece with the wrong size facing up.

3. Place a pin through both fabrics along one of the longer sides of the rectangle. Put a second pin about 1" away through both fabrics. Leave the space between the two pins open so you can turn the mask inside out when you are done sewing them together.




4. Begin sewing your fabrics together starting just after one of the pins. As you approach your first corner of the first short side stop sewing when you are about 1" away from the corner. Lift the top fabric and slide one of the elastic straps between the fabrics and line up one side of the elastic strap to the corner. Close the fabric and then sew over the elastic band several times to ensure it can't pull out. I suggest using a shorter stitch length.




5. Sew down the short side of the mask and again stop about 1" from the corner. Lift open the fabrics and pull the other end of the elastic band and line it up with the corner. Make sure the elastic strap won't be caught in your sewing. Your fabric will bunch up when you pull the elastic to the second corner - don't worry that is OK! Sew over the corner securing the elastic strap. Do the same for the second short side of the mask. Stop sewing around the perimeter of the mask when you get to the last pin marking the 1" opening making sure to back stitch a few stitches in place.



6. Turn the mask inside out through the 1" opening. Finger press or iron the mask flat. Make sure the opening you used to flip the mask inside out is lined up flat so when you sew around the perimeter of the mask it gets sewn shut.


7. We are now going to make three pleats along the short edges of each side of the mask. I find it is easiest to locate the center of each short side then make a 1/2" pleat and pin it in place. Make a another 1/2" pleat above the center pleat and another 1/2" one below the center pleat, pinning each pleat for a total of 3 pleats. Do the same to the other side making sure the pleats on both sides go the same way! The short side of the mask will now measure about 3 to 3 1/2 inches now that you have added pleats.





8. Top stitch around the entire perimeter of the mask using a 1/4" seam allowance. Make sure you sew the 1" opening along the top edge closed too. Also, as you stitch over the pleats I recommend removing the pins as you go so you don't break a needle.

9. Sew a second top stitch about 1/4" away from the first row of top stitching around the perimeter of the mask.




That's it! You are all done - Congratulations! Easy wasn't it? Now you can feel more protected from the nasty germs, dust and other debris floating around the air.




Since your mask is 100% cotton you can wash it and dry it over and over so it can be used multiple times.

This is a great project to use up scrap fabrics you have been storing too! Make a bunch and bring them to your local assisted living center to give away to staff and residents.


**ATTENTION - URGENT NEED**

Check out this amazing database put together by Deaconess that shows nationwide locations that need hand sewn face masks.

Also, if you are unable to make your own fabric face mask you can purchase a ready made one from my Etsy shop Sapucha HERE

Friday, March 20, 2020

Easy Homeschooling Activity To Teach Your Child How To Count Money & Make Change

Are you new to homeschooling or maybe you have been doing it awhile but you are looking for a creative way to teach your elementary aged children about money.


Don't miss out! Pin this for later!




This post contains affiliate links which means if you click on a link and make a purchase I may receive a small commission at no additional cost to you. Thanks!

Counting money, making change and budgeting are valuable skills all children need to learn. It can be kind of boring or hard to grasp the concept if the only exposure they get when learning about this is from worksheets or online.

What has worked very well with my children when they were learning about money was to use actual money and create their own store right in the comfort of our home! 

Today I'm going to show you what we did so you can give it a try at your house and bring the lessons about counting money and making change to life.




Fun Way To Teach Your Child How To 

Count Money & Make Change


Getting Started

I will assume at this point your children have had some instruction on what all the coins and paper currency in our country look like and what the value of each one is. If you haven't gotten that far yet then it is time to crack open their piggy banks and spend some time exploring coins and paper bills. 

Once your children have a good grasp on coins, skip counting by 5's, 10's and 25 it is time for them to open their first in-home store. Here is how we set ours up!

Gather Store Inventory

Have your children gather up toys, clothes, games and any other items they no longer use or want. I gave each of my kids their own fabric bin to fill. We picked an area in our house that was an open space and each child was given a small table like a snack tray or coffee table to set up their things. 

Tip - this is a great time to talk about how stores position certain brands to draw customer's attention! 

Once your children are done setting up their stores it is time to create a store name and sign. Pull out the craft supplies and let them go wild creating, decorating and designing their own store sign and logo. When they are done have them tape or post their store sign to their table or close to it!

Price To Sell

Allow your children to set the prices for the items in their shop. I recommend keeping the math simple by providing them with pricing guidelines. Using whole dollar amounts as well as amounts equal to the coins they are learning about help keep the math simpler as they start.

Tip - talk to your kids about the price of items they see you buying at the grocery store or mall. Show them how brand name items are usually more expensive than generic. 

Not every item in their store needs to have individual price tags. A pricing sheet could be used instead where they list a brief description and a price like this: stuffed animal = $1, Perler bead creations = $0.25.


Cha....Ching!

Time to let the kids open their stores! They will be super excited to show off their goods and will be ready to start selling. It is best to establish ground rules regarding sales. Kids should decide if all sales are final or if this is just for fun and everyone gets their stuff back at the end.

Since the whole purpose of this exercise is to teach your kids how to count money it might be best to have mom (or dad) be the keeper of the cash/change box. This ensures that all transactions are done correctly and under supervision (preventing any problems!).

I also find it best that the money used for shopping and making change is provided by Mom/Dad. Kids who are just learning about money might get confused or worried that their own money won't be returned to them when all of this fun is done. So next time you are at the bank ask the clerk for a variety of small paper currency and a few rolls of each denomination of coins to use as the store cash box and shopper cash.

tip - my kids have a cool little toy cash register toy that dings and has buttons to push that we use when we play store. Using a toy cash register isn't necessary but it sure is a lot more fun! 

Making Their First Sale

Once the stores are open it is time for the kids to do some shopping. Let your children take turns being a shopper and a store keeper. If you choose to invite neighbors, grandparents or friends over to shop their stores set a time for the stores to be open and closed. Make sure everyone knows this is just for practice and all items and cash will be returned at the end.

When a customer selects an item to purchase, have the child who owns the store bring the item to the cash register. Have the customer pay the child then you can help them count back change. After your child gets the hang of counting back change let them try it on their own.

tip - explain to your child what good customer service is and how they can be a better store owner by practicing what you discuss.

This is a super fun way to teach kids how to count money and make change that they won't forget. I hope you children enjoy creating their own store and selling their inventory as much as mine love this activity.


Teach Your Child How To Tell Time

Looking for more homeschooling help? I've put together another great post that will help you teach your children how to tell time on an analog clock! Check it out and remember to Pin it for later too. 

Click To Read Full Post